Tuesday, March 13, 2007

An unexpected find

Sometimes my work takes me to strange places, like the Cruise Terminal in Rotterdam. This was the place where large ocean liners used to dock and let passengers ashore. The building now functions as a conference center. The owners have decorated the exterior as well as the interior with a font that bears a vague resemblance to the lettering that was used in Amsterdam around 1920, 1930. This Rotterdam typeface is a bit less sophisticated and I'm still trying to find out if it is an existing font or something that was especially designed fot the Terminal. I'll let you know what the outcome of this small investigation is. I added an extra picture, this one from the side of the building, where the text is placed in a box. This feature is also present on the windows on the ground floor. Even the plates in the restaurant have a boxed-in text, this one is a bit rounded to fit into the curves of the porcelain.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Whatever the outcome of your research will be (I'm curious too), the typeface is obviously inspired by the lettering which was already used in the 1930's, see the link below.

http://www.travelbrochuregraphics.com/Benelux_pages/benelux_2/rotterdam5.htm

Greetings,
Sander

Richard Keijzer said...

Wow,

Thank you so much for this link. The lettering is indeed derived from the typeface on the 1929 brochure. Personally I like the O on the brochure better than what is used in Rotterdam. The latter is too bold. Apart from that, the use of a delta symbol for the A is remarkable, I'll try to explore that thought.

Anonymous said...

As far as I can see the O on the (1931) brochure "Rotterdam" is as bold as the O used on the Cruise Terminal.

Or are you talking about the O on the 1929 brochure "Auf nach Holland" by Machteld den Hertog"?
http://www.travelbrochuregraphics.com/Benelux_pages/benelux_1/aufnachholland.htm

Greetings,
Sander

Richard Keijzer said...

The lettering on the Cruise Terminal is an almost exact copy of the 1931 brochure. Only the kerning is a bit less than it used to be.
The O that was made by Machteld den Hertog in 1929 is more to my liking. The thickness is almost that of the upper stroke of the E, something I often take as a guideline. Anyway, I got the number of the Terminals' sales rep and I'll give her a call tomorrow.

lotusgreen said...

hi--i think it's neat, what you're doing, and wonder if you know about two sites (one now in retirement) doing similar work:

the scriptorium, and nick's fonts which no longer has free fonts but is interesting, and his free fonts are still available here,